How the Novavax Coronavirus Vaccine Uses Moth Cells

As companies like Moderna and Pfizer race to use cutting-edge mRNA technology to deliver the first set of coronavirus vaccines, Novavax took a different approach. The Maryland biotechnology company used insect cells to produce the coronavirus’s unique spiked protein, which can then be introduced to patients to prime their immune systems. This process is known as a recombinant protein vaccination…

If you would like to receive an e-mail notice of the most recent articles published in The Vaccine Reaction each week, click here.

7 Responses to "How the Novavax Coronavirus Vaccine Uses Moth Cells"

  1. bmc redirect   July 18, 2022 at 3:53 pm

    Mothman cometh?

    FREEDOM OF VACCINATION CHOICE, NO . . . MATTER . . . WHAT!!!

    Reply
  2. Reuben   July 18, 2022 at 4:15 pm

    No mention here of the adjuvant used in this vaccine. As has been clear for many years, it is often the overly aggressive adjuvant that causes the damaging side-effects from a vaccine. Find this out before you decide to take this shot!

    Reply
  3. covIDIOTS   July 18, 2022 at 4:19 pm

    Strangely enough, side effects reported were buzzing around light bulbs and getting hit with car windshields. A few study participants reported a new fear of bats.

    Reply
  4. Joan M Morrison   July 18, 2022 at 8:54 pm

    Not one mention of possible side effects

    Reply
  5. Pam   July 19, 2022 at 10:41 am

    I am not an entomologist but I do garden a lot and see many moths. Since the video only talked about proteins and mRNA, I wanted to know more about what moths can do to a human in general. Moths are of the paraphyletic group meaning many have a common ancestor. Does that suggest what affects one species genetically may affect other species? Not sure. Did they say what species of moth they used in the Novavax? I did some online research and found some moth caterpillar species cause lepidopterism (caterpillar dermatitis) if touched. Lymantria dispar, the spongy moth (has black and red spots in caterpillar stage) carries the NPV (spongy moth virus). Could this NPV make its way into moth vaccines? Would make a great sci-fi novel plot–every vaccinated person grows antennae and makes coccoons.The comment about “Mothman cometh” brought all sorts of sci-fi musings to mind. Have not gotten a vaccine since 2006 and won’t be wanting ANY soon. Adjuvants are on my no-list since the allergist said this may be what I react badly to when getting a vaccine. Being out in natural settings with Nature is wonderful. Science should stop messing with the genetic make-up of any living being. Sometimes the cure is worse than the disease.

    Reply
    • Arel   July 19, 2022 at 12:38 pm

      Fall Armyworm is the moth they used.

      Reply
  6. Sippi   July 24, 2022 at 9:39 pm

    Wow. 85%egfective like Pfizer and moderna? Seriously, how dumb do u think we are,?

    Reply

Leave a Reply to bmc redirect Cancel Reply

Your email address will not be published.