The Truth About Pet Vaccines

Needless to say that if your children are vaccinated, you eventually stop. Dogs and cats receive vaccine almost always at six, eight, 10, 12, 14, 16 weeks, a booster at one year of age and then annually thereafter, which ends up being a tremendous amount of vaccine over a lifetime. Not to mention that once geriatric pets become old and begin suffering from potential degenerative diseases we don’t honor the fact that the immune system could be struggling and in need of less vaccine, we just continue to vaccinate. This has brought about a whole host of issues, not only health issues for dogs and cats but a whole host of ethical issues with veterinarians who are beginning to recognize that there’s a problem here.

29 Responses to "The Truth About Pet Vaccines"

  1. Paula   September 9, 2019 at 8:21 am

    My 15 year old cat was due for vaccinations. The vets office called several times to say he was due. We took him to get the shots. A day or two later he started looking tired and didn’t eat well. Concerned I took him back to vet. They gave him fluids and a shot to give him a “boost”. However he continued to decline. He had to be put to sleep a week or so later. Since then I will not allow a cat over 10 to get shots. Later he admitted that perhaps they should not give shots to cats his age. Though, it was too late for little Joe

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  2. CDubs   September 9, 2019 at 8:29 am

    My natural vet, who is also a DVM and wrote the book, the Nature of Animal Healing, titered a dog that needed a rabies shot to go overseas. The dog had 5,000 times the amount of antibodies than necessary. He also said that large dogs get the same amt of a vaccines as small dogs. Big Pharma has their hand even here. I am not saying all vaccines are bad, but many are completely unnecessary. Dogs also get cancers at the injection site. Time to rethink how things are done.

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  3. Pat Golus   September 9, 2019 at 8:37 am

    I have a 13 year old, indoor cat who has never gone outside and has no desire to go outside. I do not take her for routine vaccinations; however, on the rare occasions when I have needed to take her to the vet for treatment, they have insisted she be vaccinated before treatment. Taking a cat to the vet can be a traumatizing experience. Why do I want to subject my cat to that on a yearly basis when she has already had her shots?

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  4. Susan Real   September 9, 2019 at 9:14 am

    My old English bulldog pup had a severe reaction to rabies vaccine at 7 months… it was frightening and if I had not been home and known about vaccine reactions I would’ve just moved on… scary stuff.

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  5. Laurie Raymond   September 9, 2019 at 9:51 am

    Please don’t make things out worse than they are! The standard conventional protocol for dog and cat vaccines has been under serious scrutiny and professional disagreement for at least 10 years. The AVMA and AAHA recommended interval for rabies vaccination (the only one mandated by law) has been adjusted upwards from annual booster to 3 year booster and the Rabies Challenge has shown that it will likely be adjusted upwards again, and that titer tests establishing immunity will be accepted – once the duration of immunity and the efficacy of titers is solidly confirmed. Other pet vaccines are not universally mandated, so every vet has the authority to set her own standard protocol. But the number and frequency is debated, titer results are increasingly relied upon, and the tendency is to administer core vaccines and not others unless specifically indicated by an animal’s location or lifestyle. And in 50 years of working with animals, including running a mid-size shelter and now for 16 years a dog day care, I have never encountered a vaccine schedule as demented as the one you describe. There are a few breeders who subscribe to 100% natural rearing with no vaccines at all, a very large and growing segment of vets who are conservative and offer core immunization, verified by titer, and still many old school vets who go with the annual booster program – which is bad, but I find that the science is winning over their economic motives. There is still a lively debate inside the profession, and the new, corporate owned chains of clinics are a retro influence – so it is no time to become complacent. But the lead paragraph of this article creates a straw man to attack, just as in human medicine, the establishment with government’s help attacks all critics of any part of the vaccine industry as “anti-vaxxers.” Let’s not stoop to doing to them what they do to us. Let’s curb our tendency to exaggerate to meet counter exaggerations. Ultimately it debases science and the whole point of freedom of speech, which is so that the truth can be shared without fear of reprisal in the confidence that errors will be best corrected that way.

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    • patricia l robinson   September 9, 2019 at 2:24 pm

      Laurie, thank you for your well thought out and worded comments!

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    • Jack Heginbotham RN   September 9, 2019 at 5:12 pm

      You seem very familiar with animal vaccines. Could you direct me to one single study that proves the Rabies vaccine actually prevents rabies? I am not interested in the titer studies since it is just assumed, without proof, that elevated titers due to vaccines indicate immunity. In Ohio, most of the college students who developed symptomatic mumps had elevated titers so there is no reason to believe titer levels in our pets are indicators of immunity either. I have a theory about how these all important titers are achieved before marketing begins but that is for another time.

      Since the rabies vaccine has been around forever, there must have been some kind of real scientific study done where 1/2 the subjects were given the vaccine and 1/2 weren’t, then both groups were exposed to rabies. I understand it is considered unethical to do these kinds of studies on humans but we have been doing medical experiments on animals without reserve to determine carcinogenic effects of chemicals/foodstuff for several decades. So there must be at least one study like this which proves beyond doubt that the rabies vaccine actually prevents rabies.

      Thanks in advance.

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    • Terry   September 12, 2019 at 7:48 am

      Laurie,

      My daughter’s service dog (a goldendoodle( suffered from a vaccine reaction and we titre him now. However, I was shocked to learn that when I asked about the difference between a 1 year rabid vaccine and a 3 year (thinking 3 year may be more potent and therefore, more dangerous), I was informed that it is the same dose! This is insane!

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  6. Mike   September 9, 2019 at 10:15 am

    Well, seeing that animals are treated as if they have more rights than children and babies, I can see where there would be changes in the veterinary practices. Expect further people infringements with both children and adults

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  7. Susan Munro   September 9, 2019 at 10:20 am

    One of my pets died within 2 hours of routine vax. Another had a respiratory incident within 1 hour that necessitated me going to emergency vet. He ended up with lung lesions a few years later. My 19 year old orange tabby had to go in and have his eye removed due to cancer. The vet insisted that I get the Upper respiratory vaxx. I obliged. Not only did he come down with upper respiratory within 24 hours of the surgery, which necessitated him being on antibiotics for 10 days plus recovering from the loss of an eye which was traumatic, the poor thing started losing his mind, couldn’t figure out what the kitty litter was for, laid on the bathroom rug for 23 hours of the day. I had to put him down. He was obviously damaged by not only the surgery but I’m so positive now that the proof about vaccines harming animals is just as poignant as them harming humans. I wouldn’t vaccinate myself against anything again if my life depended on it!

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  8. ch   September 9, 2019 at 10:26 am

    There is a problem even vaccinated the children. They must have 72 in order to enter school. No wonder Autism is now 1 in 4. Every shot contains mercury, that is not meant for human or animal.
    Unfortunately, the law makes you vaccinate your pets for rabies every 2-3 years. the others you could forego or do the titers test to be sure they have immunity.

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  9. Lara   September 9, 2019 at 10:29 am

    What do you suggest at your annual vet visit? Will a vet test titers? We have a very healthy and energetic dog, but when we adopted him he had heart worms. I worry he’s already been through so much undergoing that treatment, and I’d hate to keep annually vaccinating for rabies (per the state’s mandate) when I know he’s got to have adequate antibodies. Any recommendations are greatly appreciated.

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    • Stephani Knutson   September 9, 2019 at 3:14 pm

      Have a rabies titre done. It is a simple blood draw and all vets have access to send samples to labs that do the test. Most states will accept the results as adequate if they are high enough. It is more expensive, and will probably have to be done annually if the state requires annual vaccination, but it is likely to be the best option.

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  10. Kristine Carroll.   September 9, 2019 at 10:29 am

    This is absolutely true and I have witnessed it first hand with a 12 year old Yorkshire terrier with a post vaccine reaction. I run titres annually at great expense but with a clear conscience. I see overvaccination particularly as it relates to horses where I am beginning to focus my attention as I have a 24 year old show pony.

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  11. George   September 9, 2019 at 10:31 am

    My 9 year old Bichon Frise received a rabies booster vaccine and within two weeks came down with AIHA… Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia. It’s fatal in over 50% of cases. It cost me over $12,000 in vet bills over a four year period to keep him alive. Luckily he outlived his disease and died from heart failure at 16. This disease is a nightmare. You never know when a bout of anemia will strike and when it does the dog needs hospitalization and transfusions right away. Steroids only worked for about a year, then I had to put him on anti rejection meds. The rabies shot is by far the most dangerous. Avoid it at all costs after the initial shot at one year of age. Get a rabies titer to fulfill the state’s need to know you dog is immune to the disease or get a vet to write a letter stating he cannot get the shot due to an autoimmune disease.

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  12. Nancy Rabenau   September 9, 2019 at 10:34 am

    My 5 yr old moggie nearly died after vaccination. He had an antibody that attached to his red blood cells called autoimmune hematocrit disorder. The next 5 yrs he had several near death experiences, required blood transfusion(s) (risky necessity), prednisone and at 10 yrs old succumbed to cancer.

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  13. Margie   September 9, 2019 at 10:34 am

    About 17 years ago, I radically changed the diets of my dogs and also stopped vaccinating them. I had begun reading the research that, even at that time, rabies vaccine makers were testing duration of effectiveness of the vaccine and were at seven years and counting. I discovered that there was literally no difference between the 1 year and 3 year rabies vaccine other than the label. I also learned from veterinary expert Dr. Jean Dodds that there is no reported case of a dog that has undergone two rabies vaccinations ever contracting rabies. Meanwhile I discovered the concept of challenging immunity through a titer test of the dog’s blood, so I could check the dog’s current immunity to any disease.

    The result is that my dogs, adopted as adults and heavily vaccinated previously, began living 3-5 years longer than they had prior to my changes. I have since moved to another state, 1 of 8 i the US without a vet school and mediocre vet care. The demands by pushy vet techs that I vaccinate my dogs are frustrating, and there are no boarding facilities or dog daycare facilities that are available to me without constant vaccination. My choices had been accepted by my vet over time, but that vet retired and the new staff of the vet who bought the clinic are even pushier. I walk on eggshells, for fear of “being fired” by the vet’s office, which would render me unable to get assistance if I ever had an emergency with my pet. I am considering going to another vet, but the prospect of another battle is daunting. Thankfully, with no additional vaccinations and an improved diet, they virtually never get ill.

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  14. Joe   September 9, 2019 at 10:49 am

    When my beagle had puppies 14 years ago, I bought Dr. Pitcairn’s Complete Guide to Natural Health for Dogs & Cats. In it I read about puppy shots and the one size fits all approach.
    It was then that my eyes were opened and I started reseaching vaccines for children. Needless to say I did not vaccinate my children that were born in 2008 and 2011.

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  15. Grisel Gonzalez   September 9, 2019 at 10:53 am

    Please give us tips about how to detoxify pets from vaccine products once they are vaccinated.
    Thanks 😉

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  16. D. Smith   September 9, 2019 at 12:41 pm

    Vaccines for pets is simply a part of the new money game. Pets don’t need vax – – nothing ALIVE needs them.

    We have had two cockers who never were vaxxed in their lives except what the breeders had given them before we took possession of them at around age 6 weeks old. The first cocker lived to be 18 almost 19 years old – unheard of in most circles. Our second cocker is still going strong at age 13 – he’s still like a pup except he does have some vision problems common to cockers as they age.

    I credit their old ages to NO VAX. EVER. They are in our yard at all times and if we have company we put them into a kennel in the yard, because we do not want to be asked if they’ve been vaxxed and have to explain anything to anyone. It’s our own business what we do with our animals, or at least it should be – – same with our own children but the world doesn’t feel the same I guess. We do the best we can to protect all living things from the medical industry in any form. THEY are the killers amongst us.

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    • Larry   September 10, 2019 at 5:25 pm

      I couldn’t agree with you more. Vaccines are not a part of nature. They are part of a money grab by the medical industry.

      I have an 11 year old Boston Terrier that goes to the vet as often as I go to a doctor – when we have a problem. The medical industry is only good for – in my eyes – fixing broken things and diagnostics. A yearly visit to the vet? What the hell for? So he can sell you on shots and pills that you don’t need? Same with the doctor. So he can put you on statins when there’s nothing wrong with you? And jab you with a flu shot when a good daily dose of vitamin D with K2 will keep your immune system hearty and healthy with no side effects.

      I for one will NEVER relinquish control and responsibility of my or my dogs health to the medical industry. They are NOT health practitioners.

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  17. INGRID C DURDEN   September 9, 2019 at 12:55 pm

    After my first dog received all the vaccinations, before she was 6 months old, another vet told me the dog immune system does not start to work unless after that time. So all these immune boosters are useless, I guess. Because at that young age, they still have their mother’s immunity. My dog now gets the 3 year rabies, and nothing else, and is a healthy darling ! I found a vet who does not force vaccinations, and respects your choice. The moment he tries I will find another one ! It is all about the money ! Wish I had known this when she was little, would have saved me hundreds of very needed dollars

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  18. Joy Metcalf   September 9, 2019 at 2:21 pm

    Horses are even more overvaccinated. I remember bringing my mare to a barn for outside training. Their pregnant mares were vaccinated EVERY TWO MONTHS for rhinopneumonitis. That was clear proof to me that the vaccine didn’t work. A few years later, I lost a valuable pregnant mare to a (different) routing vaccination. She was the last mare from an elite stallion, carrying the last foal from another elite stallion.

    Since then I have not vaccinated any animal in my care, and I never will.

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  19. EmilyC   September 9, 2019 at 5:31 pm

    Recently had this fight with a Vet that had been my dogs Vet for 15 years. All my dogs (6) are seniors. Three have serious health issues. They wanted to vaccinate my dogs, one with prostate cancer, one with heart failure and one with an autoimmune dysfunction. I said no, not just no but hell no. What this told me is that my dogs are dogs to my Vet. If you had a toddler with a serious health issue, no one would suggest vaccinating that child. My dogs are family members that get the same respect and care as any other family member. Thank God they have an enlightened owner that understands the danger of over vaccinating.

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  20. ADRIENNE RUBINO   September 9, 2019 at 5:52 pm

    Education on Titters Testing…….If the disease shows up in the titters testing they have full immunity for that disease whether it’s extremely low or high. It showed up confirming his immunity for a particular disease..

    There is no such thing when the Vet. says, Oh you pet has a very low titters and it’s time to vaccinate again….WRONG! Don’t fall for this line of bull!

    That low titters only means his immune system is not fighting the disease….if titters comes back very high titters than his immune system is now fighting the disease. If the vaccine does not show up in the titters at all, that means you have not vaccinated or the animal has not developed a natural immunity for that disease. Know how titters work!

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  21. Cynthia Greene   September 10, 2019 at 7:02 am

    I used to get my cats rabies vaccines every year until my beautiful Maine Coon Miss Muffet got fibrosarcoma at the injection site. The vaccine was Rabvac2 by Ely Lilly and they paid for the surgery. That’s admission of guilt right there. My vet said this cancer usually comes back within a year or so and then there is no choice but to take the leg. I worry all the time now and check her every day. Also, I see people here saying they only vaccinate every 2 or 3 years. I asked my vet about that and she said the cancer rates are worse going that route. Maybe it’s a stronger dose?

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  22. michael kendall   September 10, 2019 at 4:09 pm

    I vaccinate my own dogs against Parvo and DHL as puppies and I think this really helps them to survive their first year and sets them up for a healthy adulthood, also Rabies injections but from then on nothing else, my over 60 years of maintaining healthy hunting dogs with no health problems and they all live to over 14 years is a healthy alternative to beau coup vaccines. This regimen is clearly superior to any other and I consider to be much more natural medicine.

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  23. Liesel Holt   September 13, 2019 at 1:40 am

    Dear Cynthia,
    It is not true that cancer rates go up with out vaccines for your dog. Don’t let your vet push you into it. My Bella got mast cell cancer (skin cancer that can spread to the blood stream and then the organs) from the rabies vaccine (Studies have shown this) given her by her first vet. The first vet misdiagnosed her and her cancer was almost out of control. Thank God we found a new vet that knew just how to save her. She would not vaccinate her. She said Immunocompromised pets, especially with cancer, should never be vaccinated and it is contraindicated. Bella lived 7 more years with cancer and had a full and happy life, thanks to our new vet! My new puppy came from the shelter and of course has been vaccinated but my vet respects my wishes to not give her any others ever again. She said “considering what happened to Bella I totally understand.” My other dog has been her patient 4 years and they don’t send vaccine reminders or ever ask me if I want to. They know my wishes and never bring it up.

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  24. Lori Blankenship PhD, DVM, CVA   September 14, 2019 at 9:21 am

    As a holistic veterinarian, it is with frustration that I read the experiences of pet owners. I see the results of over vaccination every day in my practice. Those who come in having stood their ground with local vets often present to me in healthy condition. The induction of disease through vaccination can be rapid, with symptoms appearing within a few hours after vaccination, or delayed with the development of chronic disease months or years later. We are fortunate in veterinary medicine to be able to spread out vaccines. There are available, for example parvo only, or distemper only vaccines that may be used instead of the traditional Distemper, Adenovirus, parvo, parainfluenza combination vaccines that are often given. Thinking about each pet as an individual also helps us in the decision of how to vaccinate. Not every dog will be exposed to Lyme, Leptosporosis, or even bordetella, allowing us to avoid these dangerous vaccines. The rabies vaccine is a one year when it is administered as a first vaccine because the immune system often does not have a permanent response to this killed vaccine when given only once. In my experience with vaccine titers of dogs given only one rabies vaccine, often by 1 year later their titers are low. After the booster, however, they do hold their titer for years. I had one patient who had an annual titer, hold his immunity for greater than 10 years. Unfortunately we do not receive titer information for every patient, but fortunately we know that most, after having two rabies vaccines are protected for an extended period of time.

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