Healer or Dealer: Who to Blame for the Opioid Crisis in the U.S.?

The opioid crisis in the U.S. has reached the point where the Drug Enforcement Administration itself says it should be doing a better job. The United States continues to be affected by a national opioid epidemic which has been spurred, in part, by the rise of opioid prescribing and misuse. The DEA can and must do better. Let’s quickly break it down. In a span of 17 years, 200,000 people have died as a result of overdose. Deaths involving opioids increased by four times from 1999 to 2016, and every day more than 650,000 opioid prescriptions are issued in the U.S.

6 Responses to "Healer or Dealer: Who to Blame for the Opioid Crisis in the U.S.?"

  1. Kathleen Egbert   April 11, 2019 at 11:38 pm

    I think the biggest reason people use opioids is that they have severe, long term pain that is poorly treated by other means The medical profession has few ways to identify the causes of this pain, so few patients get effective non drug treatment. People have no other effective remedies, and many users I know don’t even get much relief from the opioids they do use. I have a friend whose liver was nearly destroyed by the acetaminophen portion of Vicodin, which also does contain hydrocodone, an opioid. I know several people with severe intractable pain who have gone on and off opioids and have lives of living hell.

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  2. Sandra   April 12, 2019 at 4:55 am

    Who’s to blame for the opioid crisis in the US? Of course, let’s blame the Drug Enforcement Administration. They’re an easy one to blame, when the REAL culprit is protected by MSM and our US Government. Let’s get real, shall we? The ones really responsible for this epidemic of drugs and death in the US is a cabal of partners in this crime, i.e., the CIA, Central Bankers, the CDC, Big Pharma, Hospitals, many doctors, military contractors and many high ranking US military. All these criminal organizations are the ones paying the drug pusher, yet he/she’s the one that goes to prison if caught. All the others have “friends” in our US Congress that are also on the take to look the other way.

    George H. W. Bush, was a CIA asset long before he became Gov. of Texas and President of the US. While he was President of Tidewater and Zapata Oil, he was using his offshore oil rigs for the transfer of money and illegal drugs using US Coast Guard boats, since they are never searched for contraband.

    The DEA had done a great job bringing in the top honchos of drug lords and getting them sent to prison, only to have the CIA get them released and back into operation before the drug lord gets to brush his teeth and have breakfast the next morning. Keep in mind just how dangerous a DEA’s job really is. They face fully armed-to-the-teeth (the CIA provides them the best of weapons) criminals every day doing their job. But they are fighting a battle that our govt. doesn’t want won…too much money in it to put an end to it.

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  3. KC Walker   April 12, 2019 at 6:22 am

    The drug companies AND the doctors are both responsible .. A Partnership: one pushed and the other compiled.

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  4. Russ   April 13, 2019 at 10:22 am

    The entire country is taking something. Doctors put kids on Ritalin and Adderoll. Smoking cigarettes is down; vaping is up. Beer is consumed like never before. Ignorant doctors shoot infants full of vaccines for a lifetime of dependency on Big Pharma’s products.

    To think that law enforcement will fix this problem? That’s tilting at windmills.

    Naturalness has gone out of life. GMOs in the food supply, pesticides in everything, economic stress from govt policies that cater to the moneyed classes, you name it, we do it wrong in the US.

    Everyone’s trying to kill the pain they feel, physical or psychological.

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  5. carol   April 13, 2019 at 11:14 pm

    CDC
    LABORATORY-AQUIRED INFECTIONS: Borrelia burgdorferi
    Carl Tuttle
    Hudson, NH, United States

    Apr 11, 2019 —

    Please see the correspondence below identifying deaths from LABORATORY-AQUIRED Borrelia burgdorferi in 1976 before Lyme was formally identified.

    ——– Original Message ———-

    From: CARL TUTTLE
    To: brett.giroir@hhs.gov, tickbornedisease@hhs.gov
    Cc: (96 Undisclosed recipients)Date: April 11, 2019 at 10:43 AM

    Subject: The spirochete responsible for Lyme disease was not formally identified until 1982 by Willy Burgdorfer

    April 11, 2019

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services
    200 Independence Avenue, S.W.
    Washington, D.C. 20201
    Attn: ADM Brett P. Giroir, M.D., Assistant Secretary for Health

    Dr. Giroir,

    Please see the attached PDF published in 1999 by the Canadian Office of Biosafety Information which was edited by the Colorado State University Office of Biosafety.

    https://www.dropbox.com/s/pjqxu42638071sq/Infectious%20Agent.pdf?dl=0

    Excerpt:

    SECTION I – INFECTIOUS AGENT

    NAME: Borrelia burgdorferi

    Date prepared: October 11, 1997 Prepared by- Canadian Office of Biosafety

    Information edited by the Colorado State University Office of Biosafety; June 16, 1998.

    From section VI:

    LABORATORY-AQUIRED INFECTIONS: 45 reported cases up to 1976 with 2 deaths.

    ________________________________________

    Discussion…..

    The spirochete responsible for Lyme disease was not formally identified until 1982 by Willy Burgdorfer so how did laboratory personnel become infected (and with two reported deaths) prior to 1982? Notice that “modes of transmission” identified are other than vector borne.

    Were these infections acquired at Pathogen Detection Laboratories or bio-warfare facilities?

    What is most disturbing here is a reported death rate of 4% for this group. The CDC recently estimated an annual 329,000 Lyme disease cases occur yearly in the U.S. and a 4% death rate would equate to 13,160 deaths annually.

    Reference:

    How many people get Lyme disease?
    https://www.cdc.gov/lyme/stats/humancases.html

    “In this study, researchers estimated that 329,000 (range 296,000–376,000) cases of Lyme disease occur annually in the United States.”

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  6. M   April 15, 2019 at 4:01 pm

    This is going too far. My parents were very sick with health issues and my dad was in hospice and in pain and my daughter had to threaten reporting them to the state licencing for not helping him with horrible accident pain. A car drove into his bedroom where he was sleeping hit right where he was sleeping, his whole body hurt. My mom had back issues and would get shots that didn’t help much and they would not give her much for her pain. Pain can kill you. So people that really need this medication are not getting it. So all of us have to pay the price for a small amount of people who misuse. They will just get it off the streets or break into houses.

    Reply

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